847-948-5858 jayg@jabbokriver.com
Remembering Agile and Scrum Values

Remembering Agile and Scrum Values

Published on May 12, 2017 Experienced Agile practitioners and thought leaders are like Jedi, and have known for some time that agility is not merely a set of practices like Scrum but true agility is grounded in an agile mindset. I had the privilege to help institute a Learning Consortium that brought together a group of advanced agile practitioners at Magna International [MGA], Ericsson [ERIC], Solutions IQ, Microsoft [MSFT], Riot Games, CH Robninson [CHRW], agile42, Brillio, and Menlo Innovations. One of the key findings was that for an Agile culture and operations to truly flourish the members must incorporate a certain mindset and exhibit a set of supporting values. Ron Jeffries, left and Steve Denning at Agile2016. Photo courtesy Steve Denning. The Scrum Alliance suggests there are five foundational values and I find this list quite helpful. However, I have not found these five easy to remember or easy to teach others to remember. So when I teach Radical Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University or Managing the Radical Shift to Agile at University of Chicago I use the following mnemonic: FROCC.  Since experienced Agile trainers and coaches are like Jedi, and Jedi wear a medieval looking robe, also known as a frock, I use this order of the five Scrum values to help remember them: Focus  Respect Openness Courage Commitment Be a Jedi Scrum Master and Agile Practitioner! Exhibit and foster these five values. And I hope this mnemonic helps you remember the core values of an agile mindset. J. Stanton Goldstein, MBA, CSM, CSPO, CSP, is the founder and managing partner of Jabbok River Group, a Chicago-based Agile training and coaching consultancy. As a practicing Agile professional, Jay has held senior leadership positions in B2B and B2C tech companies in...
Will You Crash Your Company by Using the Wrong Math?

Will You Crash Your Company by Using the Wrong Math?

When NASA applied the wrong math they lost the $125M Mars Climate Orbiter. One team applied English units while all the other teams were using Metric units and the Orbiter crashed when approaching Mars at an altitude of only 37 miles instead of the planned 93 miles. Apply a 20th Century mathematical model and you risk crashing your organization up against the 21st Century economic planet we now all do our business upon. I am not speaking of the arithmetic for business such as accounting and finance. I am inviting you to take a step back further and consider the role that your mathematical model plays in your management mental-map. If we are in a revolution in how we organize the 21st Century enterprise then what mathematical model will accompany this new revolution? If we don’t have a new mathematical model can we even say we understand the modern firm? Like John Nash (A Beautiful Mind) needed to advance the mathematics of Game Theory to better describe economics, the mathematics that describes today’s Agile enterprises also needs to be discovered. “substantive change is coming to management…” Rod Collins, from a Wiki Management, A Revolutionary Model for a Rapidly Changing and Collaborative World [2014] Business thought leaders are now saying we are in the first transformation in the theory and practice of management in over one hundred years, really since modern management was invented by the likes of Frederick Taylor. Rod Collins, writes in his latest book Wiki Management, A Revolutionary Model for a Rapidly Changing and Collaborative World [2014] about how “substantive change is coming to management.” This “Great...